Thinking about ‘real-world science’ for career orientation
 
 
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SSPC, Department of Chemical Sciences, Bernal Institute, University of Limerick, Ireland
CORRESPONDING AUTHOR
Sarah Mary Hayes   

SSPC, Department of Chemical Sciences, Bernal Institute, University of Limerick, Limerick, Ireland
Publish date: 2019-07-22
 
ARiSE 2019;2(1):1–2
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ABSTRACT
With this editorial I am happy to introduce the first issue of the second volume of the ARISE Journal. The purpose of this editorial is to briefly discuss authentic or ‘real-world’ science, its place in society, in the classroom and how it can support and explicitly link to students’ perception of scientific careers and potentially enhance uptake of science subjects.
 
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